NEWS ~ JULIAN REQUESTS LENNIKOV’s CSIS, RCMP & CBSA FILES

OTTAWA – Peter Julian (Burnaby- New Westminster) has formally requested under the privacy act that the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) divulge any information that they have on Mikhail Lennikov.

Lennikov is currently facing imminent deportation to Russia which would separate him from his wife Irina and son Dmitri, and has sought sanctuary in his church. The government claims that Lennikov is a national security risk because of his time as a clerk in the KGB in the mid-80s, however they have yet to provide any proof despite countless requests.

“While the Conservative government has been implying that the information they have on Mr. Lennikov require his deportation, they have been unable in any way to justify their actions. The Minister of Immigration’s own internal documents stress that Mr. Lennikov has never received any training in espionage,” said Julian. “As this government is refusing to honestly justify their deportation order, I am pursuing Mikhail Lennikov’s rights of access to information under the Privacy Act to retrieve all the information on him in the hands of the government.”

Mikhail Lennikov has signed the waivers authorizing his MP Peter Julian to make requests under section 8. (2) of the privacy Act on his behalf with CSIS, the RCMP and the CBSA to access all records and information on Mr. Lennikov that are under their custody or control.

“I don’t believe that there is much in Mr Lennikov’s files and I am hoping that there will be a prompt reply from the CSIS, the RCMP and the CBSA. Since the government has been attempting to stonewall Mikhail Lennikov’s request to stay the deportation order, having these files will finally allow the public to judge this government on its refusal” said Julian.

During their 11 years of residence in Canada, the Lennikovs have never been accused of any criminal act. Mr Lennikov never withheld his past employment within the KGB, an employment that he has fully explained as reluctant and of a primarily administrative character.